Prunus kansuensis Rehd.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Prunus kansuensis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/prunus/prunus-kansuensis/). Accessed 2019-12-14.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Amygdalus kansuensis (Rehd.) Skeels

Glossary

bud
Immature shoot protected by scales that develops into leaves and/or flowers.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
ciliate
Fringed with long hairs.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
style
Generally an elongated structure arising from the ovary bearing the stigma at its tip.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Prunus kansuensis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/prunus/prunus-kansuensis/). Accessed 2019-12-14.

A tall, deciduous shrub or a small tree up to 20 ft high with a smooth, brown trunk. Leaves lanceolate, slender-pointed, 2 to 4 in. long, 38 to 114 in. wide, finely toothed, hairy along the midrib; stalk 18 to 316 in. long. Flowers crowded on the naked glabrous shoots, mostly in pairs and making cylindrical spikes 1 to 112 ft long; they are white, 34 in. wide, pink in bud; petals roundish ovate, 38 in. long; calyx grey, hairy outside, ciliate, the lobes oblong-ovate, 18 in. long; stamens white, anthers and style yellow.

Native of N.W. China, introduced to California by Meyer in 1914. It will be welcomed in gardens for its early blossoms which (regulated by the weather) may appear any time in late January or February. It is closely related to the common peach, the stone being widely, shallowly grooved but not pitted. Award of Merit when shown from Kew February 5, 1957.


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