Prunus brigantina Vill.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Prunus brigantina' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/prunus/prunus-brigantina/). Accessed 2019-12-09.

Genus

Common Names

  • Briançon Apricot

Synonyms

  • P. brigantiaca Vill.
  • P. armeniaca subsp. brigantiaca (Vill.) Dipp.

Glossary

midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Prunus brigantina' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/prunus/prunus-brigantina/). Accessed 2019-12-09.

A small, deciduous, bushy tree 10 to 20 ft high, with a short trunk. Leaves ovate or oval, often slightly heart-shaped at the base, shortly and abruptly pointed, the margins doubly and rather jaggedly toothed, 112 to 3 in. long, 1 to 212 in. wide, hairy beneath, especially on the veins and midrib; stalk 13 to 23 in. long. Flowers white or pinkish, 34 in. or so across, two or more together. Fruit like a small apricot, of a rather clear yellow, smooth.

This tree grows spontaneously in the neighbourhood of Briançon, and occurs wild in the Maritime and Cottian Alps. From the seeds the Briançonnais express an inflammable, agreeably perfumed oil, known as huile de Marmotte. This apricot has little to recommend it for gardens.


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