Prunus arabica (Oliv.) Meikle

TSO logo

Sponsor this page

For information about how you could sponsor this page, see How You Can Help

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Prunus arabica' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/prunus/prunus-arabica/). Accessed 2019-12-10.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Amygdalus arabica Oliv.
  • A. spartioides Spach
  • Prunus spartioides (Spach) Schneid.

Glossary

ovary
Lowest part of the carpel containing the ovules; later developing into the fruit.
bud
Immature shoot protected by scales that develops into leaves and/or flowers.
campanulate
Bell-shaped.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
linear
Strap-shaped.
ovoid
Egg-shaped solid.
receptacle
Enlarged end of a flower stalk that bears floral parts; (in some Podocarpaceae) fleshy structure bearing a seed formed by fusion of lowermost seed scales and peduncle.
sessile
Lacking a stem or stalk.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Prunus arabica' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/prunus/prunus-arabica/). Accessed 2019-12-10.

An unarmed shrub of broom-like habit 3 to 6 ft high, with green, glabrous, angled branches, leafless in the hot season. Leaves linear-lanceolate, up to 158 in. long, 18 to 316 in. wide, shortly stalked. Flowers solitary, sessile, borne in spring, each from a bud with numerous brown imbricating scales, 12 to 34 in. wide, white or pinkish; receptacle partly concealed by the bud-scales, broad campanulate, glabrous or almost so. Ovary densely hairy. Fruits ovoid, slightly flattened, about 1 in. long; stone smooth.

P. arabica is an almond of unusual habit, occurring in dry steppe and open oak woodland from S. and E. Anatolia to Persia. As in many plants of arid regions, its stems have to a large extent taken over the function of photosynthesis.


P scoparia (Spach) Schneid.

Synonyms
Amygdalus scoparia Spach

Closely allied to the preceding, but taller and sometimes a tree up to 20 ft high, with terete, not angled stems, and flowers up to 1 in. wide. It occupies similar habitats but is confined to Iran.

Feedback

A site produced by the International Dendrology Society.

For copyright and licence information, see the Licence page.

To contact the editors: info@treesandshrubsonline.org.