Polygala chamaebuxus L.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Polygala chamaebuxus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/polygala/polygala-chamaebuxus/). Accessed 2019-12-11.

Genus

Infraspecifics

Other species in genus

Glossary

alternate
Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
calcareous
Relating to lime- or chalk-rich soils or water.
capsule
Dry dehiscent fruit; formed from syncarpous ovary.
family
A group of genera more closely related to each other than to genera in other families. Names of families are identified by the suffix ‘-aceae’ (e.g. Myrtaceae) with a few traditional exceptions (e.g. Leguminosae).
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Polygala chamaebuxus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/polygala/polygala-chamaebuxus/). Accessed 2019-12-11.

A dwarf, creeping, evergreen shrub from 6 to 12 in. high, with glabrous, alternate, box-like, dull green leaves, 12 to 1 in. long, oval or narrow oblong, not toothed, but with a small pointed tip. Flowers 12 in. long, produced from the leaf-axils near the end of the shoot, singly or in pairs; they rather resemble the flowers of the pea family, and are creamy white, with the end of the keel bright yellow. The fruit is a flat, two-seeded capsule; seeds downy. Bot. Mag., t. 316.

This charming little shrub is a native of the mountainous regions of Central Europe, also of the Apennines and of W. Yugoslavia, etc. It occurs most abundantly on calcareous formations. It succeeds in cool, moist positions, forming neat tufts covered with the delightful flowers in April and May. Under cultivation it seems to thrive very well in a peaty soil or in a sandy loam. In positions where it thrives (and the Thames Valley with its dry, hot spells is not the most suitable) it is readily propagated by taking off the sucker growths with roots attached.


var. grandiflora Gaud.

Synonyms
P. chamaebuxus var. rhodoptera Ball
P. c. var. purpurea Neilr

Wings rose to crimson; keel often tinged with red (though it often is so even on plants with white wings). Plants of this character occur in the wild, often wholly taking the place of the normal form with white wings and a yellow keel.

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