Podocarpus nubigenus Lindl.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Podocarpus nubigenus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/podocarpus/podocarpus-nubigenus/). Accessed 2019-12-11.

Genus

Glossary

compound
Made up or consisting of two or more similar parts (e.g. a compound leaf is a leaf with several leaflets).
pruinose
Covered with a waxy bloom (as found on a plum).
receptacle
Enlarged end of a flower stalk that bears floral parts; (in some Podocarpaceae) fleshy structure bearing a seed formed by fusion of lowermost seed scales and peduncle.
simple
(of a leaf) Unlobed or undivided.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Podocarpus nubigenus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/podocarpus/podocarpus-nubigenus/). Accessed 2019-12-11.

A medium-sized tree in the wild, usually under 50 ft but said to attain 75 ft. Leaves 34 to 134 in. long, 18 to 316 in. wide, more or less radially arranged round the shoot, stiff, straight or sickle-shaped, mucronate, rich green above, lower surface with two broad pruinose bands. Male flowers in simple or compound spikes. Seeds about 38 in. wide, borne on a fleshy receptacle.

Native mainly of Chile; in the northern part of its range it occurs in the association dominated by Fitzroya cupressoides and in the moister form of Nothofagus dombeyi forest. In these latitudes it also occurs in Argentina (c. 41°-42° S.). In Chile it also occurs on the Pacific coast in Chiloe and in the archipelago at least as far south as the Messier Channel. This is a region of very high rainfall (up to 200 in. a year), which may help to explain the failure of P. nubigenus outside the moistest parts of the country, for it is not really tender. The four largest specimens in the British Isles are: Scorrier House, Cornwall, pl. 1878, 49 × 914 ft (1965); Pencarrow, Cornwall, pl. 1908, 36 × 312 ft (1970); Kilmacurragh, Eire, 38 × 712 ft and 47 × 414 ft (1966).

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

specimens: Scorrier, Cornwall, pl. 1878, 62 × 9 ft at 314 ft (1979); Pencarrow, Cornwall, pl. 1908, 36 × 312 ft (1970); Caerhays, Cornwall, 40 × 4 ft (1984); Kilmacurragh, Co. Wicklow, Eire, 41 × 8 ft and 40 × 8 ft (1980).


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