Podocarpus acutifolius × nivalis

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The British Conifer Society in memory of Derek Spicer VMM, founder member.

Credits

Tom Christian (2023)

Recommended citation
Christian, T. (2023), 'Podocarpus acutifolius × nivalis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/podocarpus/podocarpus-acutifolius-x-nivalis/). Accessed 2024-05-25.

Glossary

Credits

Tom Christian (2023)

Recommended citation
Christian, T. (2023), 'Podocarpus acutifolius × nivalis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/podocarpus/podocarpus-acutifolius-x-nivalis/). Accessed 2024-05-25.

Spontaneous hybrids intermediate between the parents. This cross is most frequently represented in gardens by material grown as Podocarpus totara ‘Pendulus’. Webby, Markham & Molloy (1987) demonstrated that two of the most widely grown ‘Podocarpus totara’ cultivars, ‘Aureus’ and ‘Pendulus’, were in fact hybrids. ‘Pendulus’ is discussed below; for ‘Aureus’ see under P. acutifolius × totara.


'Pendulus'

Synonyms / alternative names
Podocarpus totara 'Pendula'
Podocarpus totara 'Pendulus'

According to Auders & Spicer (2012) this is ‘a broad, slow-growing, pendulous plant with yellowish grey-green foliage’. Reportedly propagated from a tree near Geraldine on New Zealand’s South Island before 1993, in the UK the RHS Garden Rosemoor accessioned two plants in 1988, the same year Lady Anne Berry gifted the garden to the RHS, suggesting that these two plants were extant at the time. They grow there still and have made handsome trees, 4.5 and 5 m tall in 2017 (Tree Register 2023).