Plagianthus divaricatus J. R. & G. Forst.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Plagianthus divaricatus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/plagianthus/plagianthus-divaricatus/). Accessed 2019-12-10.

Genus

Glossary

alternate
Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
entire
With an unbroken margin.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
linear
Strap-shaped.
unisexual
Having only male or female organs in a flower.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Plagianthus divaricatus' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/plagianthus/plagianthus-divaricatus/). Accessed 2019-12-10.

A much-branched shrub up to 8 ft high, with long, slender, flexible, tough, dark coloured, pendulous branchlets bearing alternate leaves either singly or two to five clustered at each joint; both stem and leaves are glabrous. On young plants the leaves are linear, 12 to 1 in. long, 112 in. or less wide, entire, bluntish; on adult plants they are smaller and often only 14 in. or even less long. Flowers mostly unisexual, inconspicuous and of no beauty, yellowish white, 316 in. wide, borne singly or a few together at the joints, very shortly stalked. Fruit globose, the size of a peppercorn, covered with very close pale down.

Native of New Zealand and the Chatham Islands; it was cultivated by the Vilmorins at Verrières, near Paris, and flowered there as long ago as May 1851. At Kew it was grown on a wall, for which it made a graceful and distinct covering, developing into a thick tangle of dark slender stems, many of them pendulous and unbranching for more than a foot of their length. They give the shrub an evergreen character. It is a characteristic member of the coastal vegetation of New Zealand.


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