Pistacia

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Pistacia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/pistacia/). Accessed 2019-12-11.

Family

  • Anacardiaceae

Common Names

  • Mastic Trees

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
androdioecious
With only male or only hermaphrodite flowers on individual plants.
drupe
A fleshy dehiscent or indehiscent fruit with one to several seeds each enclosed in a hard endocarp (the stone).
family
A group of genera more closely related to each other than to genera in other families. Names of families are identified by the suffix ‘-aceae’ (e.g. Myrtaceae) with a few traditional exceptions (e.g. Leguminosae).
imparipinnate
Odd-pinnate; (of a compound leaf) with a central rachis and an uneven number of leaflets due to the presence of a terminal leaflet. (Cf. paripinnate.)
pollen
Small grains that contain the male reproductive cells. Produced in the anther.
simple
(of a leaf) Unlobed or undivided.
trifoliolate
With three leaflets.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Pistacia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/pistacia/). Accessed 2019-12-11.

A genus of deciduous or evergreen trees of considerable economic importance in their native countries, but as a rule too tender to be of much garden value in this. Two species may be grown without protection in the open, viz., P. terebinthus and P. chinensis-, the latter, although still rare, appears to be especially well adapted for our climate. The leaves of Pistacia are either simple, trifoliolate or pinnate, and the pinnate leaves are either equally or unequally so. Flowers inconspicuous, and without petals; male and female flowers usually occur on separate trees. The fruit is a drupe, with a one-seeded stone. The nearest ally in gardens to this genus is Rhus, from which Pistacia differs in the absence of petals.

The two species mentioned above may be grown in the open ground, but for the rest it will be necessary to provide wall space. Any ordinary garden soil suffices for them.

From the Supplement (Vol.V)

This genus is now considered by some authorities to constitute a monotypic family – the Pistaciae – differing from Anacardiaceae in being dioecious, in having probably naked flowers (the supposed calyx being probably formed from bracteoles) and in the structure of the pollen-grains.

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