Pinus × holfordiana A. B. Jacks.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Pinus × holfordiana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/pinus/pinus-x-holfordiana/). Accessed 2019-12-12.

Genus

Glossary

cone
Term used here primarily to indicate the seed-bearing (female) structure of a conifer (‘conifer’ = ‘cone-producer’); otherwise known as a strobilus. A number of flowering plants produce cone-like seed-bearing structures including Betulaceae and Casuarinaceae.
hybrid
Plant originating from the cross-fertilisation of genetically distinct individuals (e.g. two species or two subspecies).
reflexed
Folded backwards.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Pinus × holfordiana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/pinus/pinus-x-holfordiana/). Accessed 2019-12-12.

A hybrid between P. ayacahuite and P. wallichiana, described in 1933 from trees growing at Westonbirt, Glos., and named after Sir George Holford, the owner from 1892 until his death in 1926. They had been raised in 1904 from the famous specimen of P. ayacahuite var. veitchii in the arboretum, pollinated by a tree of P. wallichiana growing nearby. The shoots differ from those of P. wallichiana in usually being hairy, and the cones are broader than in that species. From P. ayacahuite it differs, at least in the type, by the apices of the cone-scales not being reflexed, but A. F. Mitchell has found that second-generation hybrids, of which many have been raised and distributed, often incline strongly to P. ayacahuite, but can usually be identified by the orange-brown bark, the greater vigour and the more open crown.

There are several specimens at Westonbirt of the original first-generation hybrids, planted in 1906, ranging from 70 to 92 ft in height and 512 to 7 ft in girth (1974). Some others, of the first or second generation, are: Wakehurst Place, Sussex, in West Wood, 79 × 7 ft (1970); Borde Hill, Sussex, pl. 1931, 62 × 914 ft (1974); R.H.S. Pinetum, Wisley, 60 × 914 ft (1969); Lythe Hill, Haslemere, Surrey, 60 × 8 ft (1969).

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

specimens: Westonbirt, Glos., two original trees in Holford Ride, both 98 × 634 ft (1983) and another in Broad Drive, 72 × 714 ft (1982); Wakehurst Place, Sussex, 92 × 734 ft (1984); Borde Hill, Sussex, pl. 1929, 75 × 1014 ft (1981); Tilgate Park, Sussex, 75 × 714 ft (1982); R.H.S. Garden, Wisley, Surrey, Pinetum, 72 × 1012 ft (1983); Lythe Hill, Haslemere, Surrey, 85 × 812 ft (1977).

P. × schwerinii – The tree at the Forest Research Station, Alice Holt, Hampshire, pl. 1957, measures 56 × 414 ft (1983).


P × schwerinii Fitschen

Another hybrid from the pollen of P. wallichiana, the seed-parent in this case being P. strobus, the Weymouth pine. It was described in 1930 from a tree found growing on the estate of Fritz Graf von Schwerin near Berlin, which had been planted in 1905 as P. strobus. It resembles P. wallichiana in habit and in some foliage characters, but the cones recall those of P. strobus. The same cross was made artificially at the Forest Research Station, Alice Holt. One tree from the cross has grown 10 ft in three years (Mitchell, Conifers in the British Isles, p. 242).

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