Pinus pumila (Pall.) Regel

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Credits

New article for Trees and Shrubs Online.

Recommended citation
'Pinus pumila' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/pinus/pinus-pumila/). Accessed 2024-03-04.

Genus

Common Names

  • Dwarf Siberian Pine

Synonyms

  • Pinus cembra subsp. pumila (Pall.) Endl.
  • Pinus cembra var. pumila Pall.

Glossary

entire
With an unbroken margin.
glaucous
Grey-blue often from superficial layer of wax (bloom).
prostrate
Lying flat.

References

There are no active references in this article.

Credits

New article for Trees and Shrubs Online.

Recommended citation
'Pinus pumila' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/pinus/pinus-pumila/). Accessed 2024-03-04.


Editorial Note

The text below is from (Bean 1976) who discussed this taxon below Pinus cembra. We are reorganising articles within Pinus to enable a partial revision of this important genus to commence in late 2023. See the Editorial Note at the beginning of the genus article for further details.


Botanically this species is near to P. cembra, although of different aspect. It is a dwarf, mostly prostrate shrub rarely over 10 ft high in the wild, the shoots downy, the leaves usually 1{1/2} to 2{3/4} in. long, hence shorter than in P. cembra, and are usually less toothed or entire (finely toothed almost throughout in P. cembra). Male flowers deep red. Cones and seeds smaller than in P. cembra, the former about 1{1/2} in. long. It is a native of the colder parts of N.E. Asia, including Japan, often forming extensive thickets above the tree-line or in other exposed places. It was in cultivation early last century, but appears to have been lost sight of until the beginning of this century, when Admiral Clinton Baker collected plants in Japan and sent them to the Bayfordbury collection.In cultivation P. pumila varies in size and habit, but is usually under 4 ft in height. It associates well with the heaths.Selections are: ‘Dwarf Blue’, with glaucous leaves and of spreading habit; and ‘Jermyns’, of slow growth and compact habit, raised by Messers Hillier.