Pinus monophylla Torr. & Frém.

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Credits

New article for Trees and Shrubs Online.

Recommended citation
'Pinus monophylla' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/pinus/pinus-monophylla/). Accessed 2024-03-04.

Genus

Common Names

  • Singleleaf Nut Pine

Synonyms

  • Pinus cembroides var. monophylla (Torr. & Frém.) Voss

Glossary

section
(sect.) Subdivision of a genus.
terete
Like a slender tapering cylinder.

References

There are no active references in this article.

Credits

New article for Trees and Shrubs Online.

Recommended citation
'Pinus monophylla' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/pinus/pinus-monophylla/). Accessed 2024-03-04.


Editorial Note

The text below is from (Bean 1976) who discussed this taxon as Pinus cembroides var. monophylla (Torr. & Frém.) Voss. We are reorganising articles within Pinus to enable a partial revision of this important genus to commence in late 2023. See the Editorial Note at the beginning of the genus article for further details.

TC, October 2023.


Leaves solitary and terete (circular in cross-section), or occasionally in pairs and then semi-terete. It has a more westerly distribution than [Pinus edulis], mainly in Utah, Arizona, Nevada, and S. California, and often forms pure stands of considerable extent. It is one of the main sources of pinyons (pine nuts). The best known and largest specimen in Britain grows in the University Botanic Garden, Cambridge; planted shortly before 1900, it measures 33 × 3{1/2} ft (1969); when young it gained an average of 8 in. in height per annum (Journ. R.H.S., Vol. 41 (1915), p. 7 and fig. 8). There are smaller trees at Edinburgh and Kew. This pine deserves to be more widely planted, especially in the drier parts of the country.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

This is better treated as a species – P. monophylla Torr. & Frem. The best recorded example grows in the University Botanic Garden, Cambridge, and measures 40 × 41⁄4 ft (1984). At Deene Park, Northamptonshire, it is 41 × 23⁄4 ft (1982) and there are smaller plants at Kew and Edinburgh.