Pinus hartwegii Lindl.

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Credits

New article for Trees and Shrubs Online.

Recommended citation
'Pinus hartwegii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/pinus/pinus-hartwegii/). Accessed 2024-03-04.

Genus

Glossary

References

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Credits

New article for Trees and Shrubs Online.

Recommended citation
'Pinus hartwegii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/pinus/pinus-hartwegii/). Accessed 2024-03-04.


Editorial Note

The text below is from (Bean 1976) who discussed this taxon below Pinus montezumae. We are reorganising articles within Pinus to enable a partial revision of this important genus to commence in late 2023. See the Editorial Note at the beginning of the genus article for further details.


This is a very near relative of P. montezumae, but is found in Mexico at higher levels and under colder conditions. The leaves are sometimes consistently in fives, sometimes in threes or in fours; they are stiff, 4 to 6 in. long, light green or grey-green. The cones are darker in colour than in P. montezumae, almost black; they are shorter, up to 4 in. long at the most, with thin scales.It is hardy enough to have been grown at one time as far east as Pampisford in Cambridgeshire, but the existing large specimens are confined to more western parts. Two trees mentioned by Elwes and Henry early this century still exist: Eastnor Castle, Heref., 82 × 6{1/2} ft (1970) and Strete Ralegh, Devon, 75 × 7 ft (1970).

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

P. hartwegiispecimens: Leonardslee, Sussex, 79 × 51⁄4 ft (1979); Cool-hurst, Sussex, 70 × 71⁄4 ft (1976); Bolderwood, New Forest, Hants, 92 × 63⁄4 ft (1979); Eastnor Castle, Heref., 88 × 7 ft (1984).