Pinus echinata Mill

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Pinus echinata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/pinus/pinus-echinata/). Accessed 2019-12-09.

Genus

Common Names

  • Shortleaf Pine

Glossary

bloom
Bluish or greyish waxy substance on leaves or fruits.
bud
Immature shoot protected by scales that develops into leaves and/or flowers.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Pinus echinata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/pinus/pinus-echinata/). Accessed 2019-12-09.

A tree 30 to 50 ft high in this country, over 100 ft high in the wild; young shoots quite glabrous, covered with blue-white bloom, slender, very brittle after they are one year old, the bark peeling the third year; terminal bud cylindrical, 14 to 13 in. long, not resinous, scales fringed. Leaves in pairs or in threes, mostly falling the second year, 112 to 4 in. long, slender, dull green; leaf-sheath 14 to 12 in. long, persistent. Cones 112 to 212 in. long, 34 to 1 in. wide at the base before expanding; conical, with a short, distinct stalk.

Native of the eastern United States from New York State southwards; cultivated in this country since early in the 18th century. It is but little known, and has, indeed, no conspicuous qualities to recommend it for garden or park. It is distinct in its blue-white young shoots, occasionally three-leaved clusters, and brittle shoots covered with peeling bark after the second year. In N. America it is a very valuable timber tree.


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