Photinia davidsoniae Rehd. & Wils.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Photinia davidsoniae' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/photinia/photinia-davidsoniae/). Accessed 2019-12-11.

Genus

Glossary

appressed
Lying flat against an object.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
inflorescence
Flower-bearing part of a plant; arrangement of flowers on the floral axis.
oblanceolate
Inversely lanceolate; broadest towards apex.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Photinia davidsoniae' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/photinia/photinia-davidsoniae/). Accessed 2019-12-11.

An evergreen tree 20 to 45 ft high, the young shoots reddish, appressed-downy; buds minute; short branches somewhat spiny. Leaves leathery, oblanceolate to narrowly oval, tapered towards both ends, usually more gradually towards the base, 2 to 6 in. long, 34 to 134 in. wide, finely toothed, dark glossy green above, pale beneath, soon quite glabrous; stalk 14 to 12 in. long. Flowers numerous, in terminal corymbs 3 or 4 in. across; each flower scarcely 12 in. wide, white. Petals roundish, spreading; calyx-tube funnel-shaped, with triangular lobes, downy like the flower-stalks. Fruits roundish, orange-red, glabrous, about 13 in. long, the calyx-lobes persisting and incurved.

Native of W. Hupeh, China; discovered in 1900 by Wilson, who describes this as one of the handsomest evergreen trees in Central China, where it is frequently planted round shrines and tombs. It is most closely allied to P. serrulata, but is well distinguished by its shorter-stalked leaves and downy inflorescence; the fruit and flowers are larger than in P. serrulata. Although not completely hardy at Kew, it is damaged only in severe winters.


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