Philadelphus 'Falconeri'

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Philadelphus 'Falconeri'' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/philadelphus/philadelphus-falconeri/). Accessed 2019-12-11.

Genus

Synonyms

  • P. falconeri Sarg.

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
hybrid
Plant originating from the cross-fertilisation of genetically distinct individuals (e.g. two species or two subspecies).
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Philadelphus 'Falconeri'' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/philadelphus/philadelphus-falconeri/). Accessed 2019-12-11.

A shrub up to 10 or 12 ft high, forming a dense mass of slender, arching branches, which become a dark purplish brown the second year; young shoots nearly free from down, slightly ribbed. Leaves ovate to ovate-lanceolate, broadly wedge-shaped at the base, slender-pointed, distantly and minutely toothed, 114 to 312 in. long, 13 to 158 in. wide, glabrous except for a few hairs on the margins and ribs beneath when young. Flowers delicately scented, pure white, 112 to 2 in. across, produced at the end of twigs 2 to 4 in. long in racemes of three to seven flowers. Petals oblong-lanceolate, 14 in. wide, slender-pointed; calyx glabrous, except for minute down at the margins of the lance-shaped lobes; styles separated half-way down.

The origin of this mock orange is not known; it was first distinguished in Parson’s nursery at Flushing, Long Island, USA, and is probably a hybrid. It is not one of the best of the genus, and although elegant in habit is shy-flowering, at least in this country. Its long, narrow petals make it one of the most easily distinguished of the genus.


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