Petteria ramentacea (Sieber) Presl

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Petteria ramentacea' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/petteria/petteria-ramentacea/). Accessed 2019-12-11.

Genus

Common Names

  • Dalmatian Laburnum

Synonyms

  • Cytisus ramentaceus Sieber
  • C. weldenii Vis.

Other species in genus

    Glossary

    apex
    (pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
    calyx
    (pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
    entire
    With an unbroken margin.
    glabrous
    Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
    standard petal
    (in the flowers of some legumes) Large upper petal; also known as ‘vexillum’.
    trifoliolate
    With three leaflets.

    References

    There are currently no active references in this article.

    Credits

    Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

    Recommended citation
    'Petteria ramentacea' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/petteria/petteria-ramentacea/). Accessed 2019-12-11.

    A deciduous, tree-like shrub of sturdy habit, 6 or 8 ft high. Leaves trifoliolate, with a slender stalk 1 to 112 in. long; leaflets oval or obovate, very shortly stalked, 1 to 2 in. long, half as much wide, rounded at the apex, glabrous, entire. Racemes terminating short twigs of the year, erect, 112 to 3 in. long; flower-stalks short, hairy. Flowers fragrant, densely arranged, yellow, 34 in. long, resembling those of a broom; calyx tubular, downy; standard petal erect. Seed-pod 112 to 2 in. long, pointed at the end, dark brown when ripe, containing five or seven seeds.

    A native of W. Yugloslavia from the region of Split southwards, mainly near the coast but extending inland into Hercegovina and Montenegro; also of northern and central Albania. It can be seen growing on the sides of the beautiful road that climbs from Kotor to Cetinje, the old capital of Montenegro. It was introduced in 1837 but is not common. It is perfectly hardy and flowers regularly in May and June, and ripens seeds which (like those of Laburnum) are poisonous.


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