Pernettya tasmanica Hook. f.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Pernettya tasmanica' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/pernettya/pernettya-tasmanica/). Accessed 2019-12-12.

Genus

Glossary

alternate
Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
berry
Fleshy indehiscent fruit with seed(s) immersed in pulp.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
prostrate
Lying flat.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Pernettya tasmanica' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/pernettya/pernettya-tasmanica/). Accessed 2019-12-12.

A dwarf, prostrate, evergreen shrub, forming large, dark green mats or carpets only a few inches high; branches much forked, slender and slightly downy when young. Leaves alternate, leathery, shortly stalked, oval-lanceolate, pointed, margins often wavy, 14 to 13 in. long, half as much wide, shining. Flowers 18 in. wide, solitary on a short stalk in the upper leaf-axils; corolla white, bell-shaped, five-lobed; stamens ten, anthers not awned. Fruit a globose red berry 38 in. wide, the persistent calyx in which it is seated often becoming fleshy and coloured also.

Native of Tasmania, where, according to Hooker, it occurs on all the mountains, especially on a granite soil, forming large green cushions there. He records that the fruits, normally red, are sometimes yellow or cream-coloured. H. F. Comber found it only 2 in. high in 1930 on an exposed moor at 4,000 ft altitude. It is a pleasing little evergreen for the rock garden where it can have a moist, preferably peaty soil.


P nana Col.

Synonyms
P. tasmanica var. neozelandica Kirk

In most of its botanical characters this species is very near to P. tasmanica, in which it was included by the younger Hooker. However, it differs in one important respect, namely that the anthers are awned, as is usual in this genus, whereas in P. tasmanica the awns are lacking. As a garden plant P. nana seems to be less easy to grow than the Tasmanian species, and is certainly no better.

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