Pernettya pumila (L.f.) Hook.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Pernettya pumila' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/pernettya/pernettya-pumila/). Accessed 2019-12-09.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Arbutus pumila L.f.
  • P. empetrifolia (Lam.) Gaud.
  • Andromeda empetrifolia Lam.

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
cartilaginous
Firm and tough but flexible; gristly.
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
mucro
Short straight point. mucronate Bearing a mucro.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
prostrate
Lying flat.
reflexed
Folded backwards.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Pernettya pumila' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/pernettya/pernettya-pumila/). Accessed 2019-12-09.

A low, often prostrate evergreen shrub frequently only a few inches high, easily distinguished from P. mucronata by the smaller ovate or ovate-lanceolate leaves having no mucro at the apex; often they are blunt or even rounded there; they are 18 to 14 in. long and have cartilaginous, very minutely toothed margins. Flowers white, nodding, bell-shaped, 316 in. wide, with five shallow reflexed lobes. Fruits globose, 316 in. wide, white or pink; calyx not fleshy.

Native of the Falkland Islands and of the Magellan region; known since the second half of the 18th century, but not introduced, so far as is known, until the 1920s or 1930s. It makes an interesting plant for the rock garden and is quite hardy, but the fruits are only borne if plants of both sexes are grown. In the wild state it bears fruit very abundantly; one collector states that they could be gathered by the bushel and cooked like huckleberries.


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