Pentactina rupicola Nakai

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Pentactina rupicola' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/pentactina/pentactina-rupicola/). Accessed 2019-12-12.

Genus

Other species in genus

    Glossary

    alternate
    Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
    apex
    (pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
    glabrous
    Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
    linear
    Strap-shaped.
    oblanceolate
    Inversely lanceolate; broadest towards apex.
    reflexed
    Folded backwards.

    References

    There are currently no active references in this article.

    Credits

    Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

    Recommended citation
    'Pentactina rupicola' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/pentactina/pentactina-rupicola/). Accessed 2019-12-12.

    A deciduous shrub 2 to 212 ft high; young shoots angled, glabrous, reddish; winter-buds silky. Leaves without stipules, alternate, very shortly stalked, mostly oblanceolate to obovate, wedge-shaped at the base, with usually three or five lobes or large teeth towards the apex, the lobes fine-pointed, often toothed, 34 to 112 in. long, 13 to 34 in. wide, glabrous above, more or less furnished with silky hairs beneath. Flowers small, white, produced in June and July on slender terminal pendulous panicles 112 to 3 in. long. Petals five, linear, 15 in. long; sepals five, triangular, persisting to the fruiting stage when they become much reflexed; stamens twenty, white, exposed. Each flower has five dry seed-vessels about 116 in. long.

    Native of the Diamond Mountains of Korea and the only species known; introduced to the Arnold Arboretum in 1918 by Wilson, who found it common on cliffs. It is a graceful dwarf shrub with clustered stems, usually found wild growing in the crevices of rocks, but with more beauty in leaf and habit than in flower. It is quite hardy.


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