Parthenocissus thomsonii (M. A. Laws.) Planch.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Parthenocissus thomsonii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/parthenocissus/parthenocissus-thomsonii/). Accessed 2020-01-19.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Vitis thomsonii M. A. Laws.
  • Cissus thomsonii (M. A. Laws.) Planch.
  • Cayratia thomsonii (M. A. Laws.) Suessenguth
  • P. henryi var. glaucescens Diels & Gilg

Glossary

entire
With an unbroken margin.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Parthenocissus thomsonii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/parthenocissus/parthenocissus-thomsonii/). Accessed 2020-01-19.

A slender, deciduous climber; young stems slightly downy at first, ribbed. Leaves composed normally of five leaflets, borne on a slender downy stalk 112 to 412 in. long. Leaflets oval or obovate, 1 to 4 in. long, 12 to 112 in. wide; slenderly pointed, the upper half shallowly but sharply toothed, the base entire and tapered to a stalk, 18 to 34 in. long; undersurface sparsely downy on the midrib, glossy. The entire leaf, leaf-stalk, and young shoots are of bright claret purple when young, becoming greenish purple later, changing finally to deep reddish purple. Flowers in cymes on a slender stalk.

A native mainly of W. and Central China, but described from a specimen collected in the Khasia Hills, Assam; introduced by Wilson from China in 1900, when collecting for Messrs. Veitch. It was awarded a First Class Certificate three years later and is, indeed, one of the most charming of the vines. It appears to be most nearly related to P. henryana, but is decidedly hardier.


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