Pachysandra procumbens Michx.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Pachysandra procumbens' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/pachysandra/pachysandra-procumbens/). Accessed 2019-12-07.

Genus

Common Names

  • Allegheny Spurge

Glossary

entire
With an unbroken margin.
inflorescence
Flower-bearing part of a plant; arrangement of flowers on the floral axis.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
spike
Inflorescence in which flowers sessile on the main axis.
unisexual
Having only male or female organs in a flower.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Pachysandra procumbens' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/pachysandra/pachysandra-procumbens/). Accessed 2019-12-07.

A semi-herbaceous plant forming low masses, with stems 6 to 12 in. high, springing unbranched from a root-stock, downy, bearing the leaves in a cluster at the top. Leaves broadly ovate, obovate, or somewhat rhomboidal; 2 to 312 in. long, often almost as wide, the upper part usually very coarsely toothed, the lower part entire and tapering to a stalk 12 to 112 in. long. The lower leaves are the largest and longest stalked; all are furnished with minute, scattered hairs. The unisexual flowers are borne at the base of the stem (between the flowers and the leaves the stem is bare), crowded on several erect, cylindrical spikes 2 to 4 in. high; female flowers few, and confined to the base. The most conspicuous part of the spike is the stamens, with their pale, flattened stalk 13 in. long; the sepals are greenish or purplish. Bot. Mag., t. 1964.

Native of the south-eastern United States from Virginia and Kentucky southwards; introduced in 1800. It grows vigorously in sheltered shady places. The inflorescence is formed in autumn, and expands in spring. Flowers unpleasantly scented.


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