Olearia × mollis (Kirk) Ckn.

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Credits

New article for Trees and Shrubs Online.

Recommended citation
'Olearia × mollis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/olearia/olearia-x-mollis/). Accessed 2022-10-03.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Olearia ilicifolia var. mollis Kirk

Glossary

hybrid
Plant originating from the cross-fertilisation of genetically distinct individuals (e.g. two species or two subspecies).
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
tomentum
Dense layer of soft hairs. tomentose With tomentum.
variety
(var.) Taxonomic rank (varietas) grouping variants of a species with relatively minor differentiation in a few characters but occurring as recognisable populations. Often loosely used for rare minor variants more usefully ranked as forms.

References

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Credits

New article for Trees and Shrubs Online.

Recommended citation
'Olearia × mollis' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/olearia/olearia-x-mollis/). Accessed 2022-10-03.

A natural hybrid between O. ilicifolia and O. lacunosa, intermediate between them. Leaves resembling those of O. lacunosa but comparatively shorter and broader, lanceolate, with a thick white or yellowish-white tomentum beneath, rounded at the base, with small scarcely spinous marginal teeth.O. × mollis was originally described (as a variety of O. ilicifolia) from specimens collected in the South Island of New Zealand.


'Zennorensis'

A shrub to 6 ft high. Leaves narrow, pointed, sharply toothed, about 4 in. long and {1/2} in. wide, dark olive-green above, white-tomentose beneath.This olearia was distributed by W. Arnold-Forster, who had a notable collection of olearias in his garden at Zennor in Cornwall. It is a beautiful foliage plant, fairly readily propagated by cuttings, and tolerant of maritime exposure. It is not reliably hardy near London, but should survive all but the severest winters in a sheltered position.