Nothofagus menziesii (Hook, f.) Oerst.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Nothofagus menziesii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/nothofagus/nothofagus-menziesii/). Accessed 2019-12-14.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Fagus menziesii Hook. f.

Glossary

strobilus
Cone. Used here to indicate male pollen-producing structure in conifers which may or may not be cone-shaped.
USDA
United States Department of Agriculture.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
cuneate
Wedge-shaped.
dbh
Diameter (of trunk) at breast height. Breast height is defined as 4.5 feet (1.37 m) above the ground.
entire
With an unbroken margin.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
hybrid
Plant originating from the cross-fertilisation of genetically distinct individuals (e.g. two species or two subspecies).
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
petiole
Leaf stalk.
rhombic
Diamond-shaped. rhomboid Diamond-shaped solid.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Nothofagus menziesii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/nothofagus/nothofagus-menziesii/). Accessed 2019-12-14.

An evergreen tree 60 to 80 ft (occasionally 100 ft) high in the wild state, with a trunk 6 to 16 ft in girth and silvery white when young; young shoots clothed with yellowish-brown down. Leaves roundish ovate to diamond-shaped, broadly wedge-shaped at the base, rounded or pointed at the apex, doubly round-toothed, 13 to 58 in. long, 14 to 12 in. wide, glabrous on both surfaces except for one or two pits in the blade near the base beneath, which are lined with brown hairs; stalk 116 in. long, downy. Male flowers solitary. Husks 14 to 38 in. long, with four or five rows of gland-tipped appendages on each valve. Nutlets three, their wings prolonged at the apex and ending in gland-tipped points.

Native of New Zealand on both islands, up to 3,500 ft above sea-level. It is allied to N. cunninghamii, but that species has singly (not doubly) toothed leaves, and the curious hairy pits seen in N. menziesii are absent. Also in N. cunninghamii the wings of the nutlets are not prolonged at the apex.

Although not a success at Kew, N. menziesii is hardy enough in mid-Sussex in a sheltered position, as is shown by the tree at Nymans, which was planted before 1917 and measures 57 × 614 ft (1970). Others are: Caerhays, Cornwall, 62 × 834 ft at 1 ft, dividing into five stems at 3 ft (1971) and another of 64 × 634 ft (1971); Trewithen, Cornwall, 54 × 334 ft (1971); Galloway House, Wigtons., a bush 40 ft high (1967); Castlewellan, Co. Down, N. Ireland, 30 × 234 ft (1966); Mount Usher, Co. Wicklow, Eire, 39 × 314 ft at 3 ft (1966).

Although some specimens of N. menziesii in this country have a whitish bark, as is said to be usual in young trees in New Zealand, they more commonly have a bark resembling that of the common gean, dark in colour with horizontal bands of lenticels.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

specimens: Nymans, Sussex, 75 × 714 ft (1985); Tregrehan, Cornwall, 55 × 5 + 314 ft (1979); Caerhays, Cornwall, 62 × 834 ft at 1 ft, dividing into five stems at 3 ft, and another of 64 × 634 ft (1971); Trewithen, Cornwall, 60 × 5 ft (1985); Mount Usher, Co. Wicklow, Eire, 40 × 4 + 3 ft (1975).

From New Trees

Nothofagus menziesii (Hook. f.) Oerst. XXXN. obliqua (Mirb.) Blume

A semi-evergreen tree intermediate in characters between its parents. Bark cherry-like, purple-brown, with slender horizontal bands of pale lenticels, becoming grey and vertically fissured at the base. Young shoots slender, tomentose. Leaves thinly leathery, rhombic-ovate, to 2.5 1.3 cm (on vigorous shoots to 3 1.5 cm), glossy green and glabrous above, pale blue-green and glabrous beneath except for sparse hairs along the midrib, secondary veins four to six on each side of the midrib, sharply double-toothed or even shallowly lobed, base entire, broadly cuneate and sometimes slightly unequal; petiole tomentose, 3 mm. A. Coombes, pers. comm. 2007. Distribution Only in cultivation. USDA Hardiness Zone 8.

This unique hybrid between an evergreen species from New Zealand (N. menziesii) and a deciduous one from Chile (N. obliqua) arose in cultivation in the United Kingdom, the earliest record being from Weston Park on the Shropshire/Staffordshire border (Wigston 1979). It remains rare in cultivation, with only a few specimens recorded in the major British collections, but it is capable of achieving good stature quite rapidly; Owen Johnson has measured trees of 15 m at Kew (2001) and 16 m at Wakehurst Place (2005) (TROBI). At the Hillier Gardens two specimens were received from the Forestry Commission at Alice Holt in 1982 (without further information), of which the survivor had reached 12.5 m (38 cm dbh) in 2007 (A. Coombes, pers. comm. 2007). Allen Coombes, to whom we are indebted for the description of this tree, reported in early December 2007 that the tree was still in full leaf at that time, though a few leaves were turning yellow. He has not observed flowers or fruit. The fine, straight Kew specimen was half-bare in January 2008, and many of the remaining leaves were yellowish. The strongly double-toothed or weakly lobed margins give the leaf a very distinctive outline.


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