Neolitsea sericea (Bl.) Koidz.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Neolitsea sericea' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/neolitsea/neolitsea-sericea/). Accessed 2019-12-09.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Laurus sericea Bl.
  • Litsea glauca Sieb.
  • Neolitsea glauca (Sieb.) Koidz.

Other species in genus

    Glossary

    acuminate
    Narrowing gradually to a point.
    acute
    Sharply pointed.
    apex
    (pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
    axillary
    Situated in an axil.
    cuneate
    Wedge-shaped.
    androdioecious
    With only male or only hermaphrodite flowers on individual plants.
    ellipsoid
    An elliptic solid.
    glabrous
    Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
    glaucous
    Grey-blue often from superficial layer of wax (bloom).

    References

    There are currently no active references in this article.

    Credits

    Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

    Recommended citation
    'Neolitsea sericea' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/neolitsea/neolitsea-sericea/). Accessed 2019-12-09.

    A small evergreen dioecious tree with silky young stems. Leaves leathery, three-veined from near the base, oblong-elliptic or broadest slightly below the middle, 3 to 6 in. long, 114 to 234 in. wide, acute to acuminate at the apex, cuneate at the base, young leaves covered with silky, golden-brown hairs, when mature the upper side glabrous, the lower one glaucous and usually with traces of the juvenile hairs; petioles about 1 in. long. Flowers produced in autumn in axillary clusters. Fruits red, ellipsoid, about 12 in. long, only borne on female plants.

    Native of Japan, Korea (Cheju Do Island), and China; date of introduction uncertain. It is quite a handsome evergreen with remarkable young foliage, very uncommon but apparently hardy.

    A plant at Wakehurst Place in Sussex, identified as N. sericea, but perhaps wrongly, bore black fruits and had the undersurface of the year-old leaves still closely covered with a coating of silky, silvery or pale bronze hairs and appearing as if burnished. The young foliage was hairy as in N. sericea and was not produced until quite late in the summer. This plant died in 1975.


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