Lonicera standishii Jacques

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Lonicera standishii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/lonicera/lonicera-standishii/). Accessed 2020-03-30.

Genus

Glossary

berry
Fleshy indehiscent fruit with seed(s) immersed in pulp.
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Lonicera standishii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/lonicera/lonicera-standishii/). Accessed 2020-03-30.

A deciduous or partially evergreen bush 6 or 8 ft high in the open, 12 ft or more against a wall; the bark of the stem and older branches peeling; young shoots warted and bristly. Leaves oblong-lanceolate, 2 to 412 in. long, 34 to 2 in. wide, rounded or broadly wedge-shaped at the base, slenderly pointed, prominently veined beneath, bristly on the margins and on both sides of the midrib, also more or less over the surface; stalk bristly, 18 in. long. Flowers produced from November to March (according to the mildness of the season), often in two pairs at each joint; flower-stalk has downward pointing bristles. The flowers are creamy white, very fragrant, about 12 in. wide, the tube of the corolla bristly outside. Fruits ripe in early June, red, the two ovaries united nearly to the top and forming an inversely heart-shaped berry; stalk 12 in. long, bristly. Bot. Mag., t. 5709.

Native of China; introduced by Fortune in 1845. It is in no way showy, but has always been a favourite because of the early date at which it flowers and for its charming fragrance. Although the first flowers come as early as November, it is usually at its best in February. It is perfectly hardy, and is only grown on walls for the sake of protection for its early flowers.


var. lancifolia Rehd

Leaves narrowly lanceolate, usually under 1 in. in width. Introduced by Wilson in 1908, from W. China.

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