Lonicera splendida Boiss.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Lonicera splendida' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/lonicera/lonicera-splendida/). Accessed 2020-04-01.

Genus

Glossary

corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
connate
Fused together with a similar part. (Cf. adnate.)
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
glandular
Bearing glands.
glaucous
Grey-blue often from superficial layer of wax (bloom).
sessile
Lacking a stem or stalk.
spike
Inflorescence in which flowers sessile on the main axis.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Lonicera splendida' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/lonicera/lonicera-splendida/). Accessed 2020-04-01.

A vigorous evergreen climber allied to L. periclymenum and L. etrusca, making growths up to 6 ft or more long in a single season. Leaves on the flowering shoots oval to oblong, 1 to 112 in. long, glabrous and glaucous, all sessile and the upper pairs connate; leaves on the extension growths smaller and stalked. Inflorescences glandular, sessile, with three to five whorls of flowers. Corolla 1 to 112 in. long, reddish purple and glandular on the outside, yellowish white within. Flowering season June to August. Bot. Mag., t. 9517.

Native of Spain; introduced about 1880. It differs from the common woodbine in having the upper pairs of leaves connate; from L. etrusca in having the flowers in a terminal stalkless spike, springing directly from the uppermost pair of leaves; and from both in its glaucous leaves and glandular inflorescences. This beautiful plant, which fully deserves its specific epithet, is not common in gardens but is hardy on a south-facing wall. There is a fine specimen in the National Trust garden at Sissinghurst in Kent.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

Graham Thomas tells us that this species grows well on warm walls in the National Trust gardens at Wallington Hall, Northumberland and Crathes Castle, south-west of Aberdeen.


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