Lonicera prostrata Rehd.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Lonicera prostrata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/lonicera/lonicera-prostrata/). Accessed 2020-04-08.

Genus

Glossary

ciliate
Fringed with long hairs.
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
linear
Strap-shaped.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
prostrate
Lying flat.
style
Generally an elongated structure arising from the ovary bearing the stigma at its tip.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Lonicera prostrata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/lonicera/lonicera-prostrata/). Accessed 2020-04-08.

A deciduous bush of low, rounded habit, forming a hemispherical mass of slender hollow branches; young shoots slightly hairy and purplish. Leaves oval or ovate, tapered at both ends, but more abruptly at the base; 34 to 118 in. long, 14 to 12 in. wide, ciliate, upper surface downy at first, becoming glabrous, midrib and chief veins sparsely downy beneath; leaf-stalk hairy, 110 in. long. Flowers pale yellow, not fragrant, borne in pairs from the leaf-axils on slightly downy stalks, 14 in. long; corolla 58 in. long, two-lipped, the tube not so long as the lips, hairy within and without; stamens and style hairy at the base; bracts linear, hairy, 16 in. long; bractlets rounded, ciliate. Berries distinct egg-shaped, reddish, 14 to 13 in. long.

Native of W. China; discovered and introduced by Wilson about 1904. It is not of any special beauty in flower, but its prostrate habit is distinct, and will make it useful for ground cover. It used to thrive in the Coombe Wood nursery, where it flowered about the beginning of June. Akin to L. trichosantha.


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