Lonicera prolifera (Kirchn.) Rehd.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Lonicera prolifera' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/lonicera/lonicera-prolifera/). Accessed 2020-01-21.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Caprifolium proliferum Kirchn.
  • L. sullivantii A. Gray

Glossary

corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
glaucous
Grey-blue often from superficial layer of wax (bloom).
lax
Loose or open.
spike
Inflorescence in which flowers sessile on the main axis.
style
Generally an elongated structure arising from the ovary bearing the stigma at its tip.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Lonicera prolifera' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/lonicera/lonicera-prolifera/). Accessed 2020-01-21.

A deciduous spreading shrub, with stems up to 6 ft long, lax, but scarcely climbing. Leaves oval, obovate or oblong, 2 to 4 in. long, 114 to 212 in. wide, glaucous and slightly downy beneath, more glaucous on the upper side, one or more of the upper pairs are united at the base, and form a roundish disk clasping the stem; of thickish substance. Flowers yellow, not fragrant, produced in June at the end of the current season’s growth in a terminal stalked spike, composed of two or more whorls, sometimes branched at the base. Corolla two-lipped, about 1 in. long, the tube longer than the lips, slender, slightly swollen on one side; glabrous outside; style slightly hairy. Berries reddish yellow, 14 to 12 in. diameter.

Native of central N. America; long grown in gardens – in early times as “L. flava”, which is a rarer and more beautiful shrub than L. prolifera. The latter is closer to L. dioica, a species distinguished by its shorter corolla, the tube of which is about as long as the lips, the leaves and style quite glabrous. L. prolifera does not need a support except when quite young and may be grown in the open as an elegant, loose bush.


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