Lonicera giraldii Rehd.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Lonicera giraldii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/lonicera/lonicera-giraldii/). Accessed 2020-01-17.

Genus

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
entire
With an unbroken margin.
panicle
A much-branched inflorescence. paniculate Having the form of a panicle.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Lonicera giraldii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/lonicera/lonicera-giraldii/). Accessed 2020-01-17.

An evergreen climber forming a dense tangle of twining branches, thickly clothed with yellowish erect hairs when young. Leaves narrowly oblong, with a lance-shaped apex and a heart-shaped base, 112 to 312 in. long, 12 to 1 in. wide, densely hairy on both sides; stalk 13 in. or less long, hairy. Flowers purplish red, borne in a short terminal panicle 112 in. across; corolla two-lipped, 34 in. wide, yellowish hairy outside; the tube slender, 12 in. long; the entire flower 1 in. long; bracts inconspicuous. Fruits purplish black. Bot. Mag., t. 8236.

Native of Szechwan, China, whence it was introduced to France in 1899, and first grown by Maurice de Vilmorin. I first saw it growing against a wall in the garden of Phillipe de Vilmorin at Verrières-le-Buisson, near Paris, in June 1908, then in flower. Plants were obtained for Kew the following autumn, and these, so far as I am aware, represent its first introduction to Britain. As I saw it, it was a striking honeysuckle forming a dense thicket, the whole plant having a yellowish tinge, very downy, the rather small flower clusters striking in the contrast of lurid red corolla and yellow stamens. It is hardy in the south and west of England.

It belongs to the same group as L. japonica (sect. Nintooa).


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