Loiseleuria procumbens (L.) Desv.

TSO logo

Sponsor this page

For information about how you could sponsor this page, see How You Can Help

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Loiseleuria procumbens' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/loiseleuria/loiseleuria-procumbens/). Accessed 2020-08-03.

Genus

Common Names

  • Alpine Azalea

Synonyms

  • Azalea procumbens L.

Other species in genus

    Glossary

    calyx
    (pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
    corolla
    The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
    capsule
    Dry dehiscent fruit; formed from syncarpous ovary.
    corolla
    The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
    glabrous
    Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
    mealy
    Covered with coarse flour-like powder. (Cf. farinose.)

    References

    There are currently no active references in this article.

    Credits

    Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

    Recommended citation
    'Loiseleuria procumbens' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/loiseleuria/loiseleuria-procumbens/). Accessed 2020-08-03.

    A procumbent evergreen shrub, much-branched, forming low tufts 3 to 6 in. high; branches tortuous, very leafy, glabrous, rooting freely along the ground. Leaves opposite, oval or oblong, 18 to 13 in. long, scarcely half as wide, with the margins so much recurved as almost to hide the undersurface, glabrous and dark glossy green above, glabrous or sometimes with a whitish mealy down beneath; stalk one-fourth to half as long as the blade. Flowers rosy or nearly white, about 14 in. in diameter, produced in May in short terminal clusters, two to five together. Corolla erect, bell-shaped, with five lobes. Calyx with five deep lobes half as long as the corolla. Stamens five, shorter than the corolla. Seed-vessel a dry capsule, with two or three divisions, many-seeded.

    Native of the Alpine summits and sub-arctic regions of the three northern continents, and the only species known. Found on the Scottish highlands. It needs a peaty soil. In the south of England it does not thrive well; the summer is usually too hot and dry for it. Some cool damp spot on the lower part of the rock garden should be selected for it.

    Feedback

    A site produced by the International Dendrology Society.

    For copyright and licence information, see the Licence page.

    To contact the editors: info@treesandshrubsonline.org.