Lindera erythrocarpa Makino

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Lindera erythrocarpa' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/lindera/lindera-erythrocarpa/). Accessed 2020-09-26.

Genus

Glossary

USDA
United States Department of Agriculture.
acute
Sharply pointed.
alternate
Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
asl
Above sea-level.
axillary
Situated in an axil.
caducous
Falling off early.
dbh
Diameter (of trunk) at breast height. Breast height is defined as 4.5 feet (1.37 m) above the ground.
entire
With an unbroken margin.
ferruginous
Rust-coloured.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
glaucous
Grey-blue often from superficial layer of wax (bloom).
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
oblanceolate
Inversely lanceolate; broadest towards apex.
obtuse
Blunt.
petiole
Leaf stalk.
pistillate
Female referring to female plants (dioecy) or flowers (monoecy) or the female parts of a hermaphrodite flower.
pubescent
Covered in hairs.
sessile
Lacking a stem or stalk.
staminate
Male referring to male plants (dioecy) or flowers (monoecy) or the male parts of a hermaphrodite flower.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Lindera erythrocarpa' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/lindera/lindera-erythrocarpa/). Accessed 2020-09-26.

A large deciduous shrub; branchlets yellowish brown; winter-buds sessile. Leaves pinnately veined, oblanceolate, mostly acute or subacute, glabrous above, somewhat glaucous and sparsely downy beneath, 212 to 5 in. long, 58 to 1 in. wide, on petioles to about 34 in. long. Fruits globose, about 14 in. wide, red.

A native of Japan (main and southern islands), Korea and China; in cultivation at Kew, to which it was introduced from the wild through the Chollipo Arboretum, South Korea, and planted out in 1983/4.

From New Trees

Lindera erythrocarpa Makino

Tree to 12 m, 0.25 m dbh. Branchlets yellowish brown and pubescent, though later glabrous with sparse lenticels. Leaves deciduous, alternate, 4–17 × 1.5–3.5 cm, oblong to oblanceolate, papery, upper surface green and glabrous, lower surface glaucous and glabrous or with some silky hairs, purple-ferruginous when dry, four to eight lateral veins on each side of the midrib, margins entire, apex acute to obtuse; petiole 0.5–1.4 cm long, glabrous. Inflorescences produced with first leaves; clusters axillary, with 10–15 flowers and four caducous bracts. Flowers small, yellowish green, tepals six, slightly pubescent on both surfaces; staminate flowers with nine fertile stamens; pistillate flowers with nine staminodes. Fruit globose and shiny scarlet, pulp oily and fragrant, 0.7–0.8 cm diameter. Flowering May, fruiting October (Taiwan). Liao 1988, 1996b. Distribution CHINA: Anhui, Fujian, Guangdong, Guangxi, Henan, Hubei, Hunan, Jiangsu, Jiangxi, Shaanxi, Shandong, Sichuan, Zhejiang; JAPAN: Honshu, Kyushu, Shikoku; NORTH KOREA; SOUTH KOREA; TAIWAN. Habitat Broadleaved forest to elevations of 2300 m asl. USDA Hardiness Zone 6–7. Conservation status Not evaluated. Illustration NT449, NT453. Cross-reference S307.

Lindera erythrocarpa is one of the highlights of the genus, capable of forming a true, single-stemmed tree that blazes with bright yellow foliage in autumn. The abundant, clear yellow flowers appear in spring and are followed by heavy crops of red fruits that can be quite ornamental in their own right. It can form a more shrubby specimen (Dirr 1998), but at the Scott Arboretum there is a group of three trees some 10 m tall with clean single trunks up to 15 cm dbh. It is also grown as a single-stemmed tree at Arboretum Wespelaar. It is in relatively widespread cultivation in Europe and North America, and is freely available commercially. The species has been introduced on numerous occasions, Chollipo Arboretum having been a source of material from Korea since at least 1981 (Kew records). Material from Japan is also cultivated (for example, WAHO 841, collected by Warner & Howick in Honshu in 1987), but no collections from China have been traced.

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