Ligustrum lucidum Ait. f.

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Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Ligustrum lucidum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/ligustrum/ligustrum-lucidum/). Accessed 2020-01-17.

Genus

Glossary

lustrous
Smooth and shiny.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Ligustrum lucidum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/ligustrum/ligustrum-lucidum/). Accessed 2020-01-17.

An evergreen shrub of erect habit, 10 to 18 ft high, or a small tree up to 50 ft; devoid of down in all its parts. Leaves narrowly oval or ovate, from 3 to 6 in. long, 1 to 212 in. wide, tapering at the base, long-pointed, glossy dark green above; stalk 13 to 12 in. long. Flowers white, produced during August and September in erect terminal panicles 6 to 8 in. high and nearly as much wide. Fruits oblong, 13 to 12 in. long, blue-black, not frequently produced with us. Bot. Mag., t. 2565.

Native of China; introduced in 1794. Of the truly evergreen privets, this is the handsomest and best. A well-grown plant with the large lustrous leaves and a crowd of erect panicles is one of the most effective of autumn garden pictures. According to Henry, this privet is 20 to 30 ft high, and the commonest evergreen tree in some parts of Hupeh, China. Wilson, in the Min River Valley, found one example 60 ft high and 10 ft in girth. In China it possesses some economic importance in being the tree on which the ‘white-wax’ insect deposits its eggs. It is sometimes confused with L. japonicum (q.v.).

L. lucidum makes a larger tree than was once supposed. By Winchester Cathedral there was a specimen measuring 49 × 6 ft (1961), probably the finest in the country; it was damaged beyond repair by a gale in 1970 and has been felled. The largest example at Kew, near the stone pine, is 42 × 3 ft and about 25 ft wide (1967).

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

Alan Mitchell tells us that there is a plant in Bournemouth Park which has leaves of a rich gold with some shading to dark green; it makes a large dome 36 ft high and 40 ft in spread (1985).


'Alivonii'

Leaves longer, narrower, thinner, and less glossy, often variegated; they are 3 to 7 in. long and 1 to 2 in. wide; young twigs minutely downy. Fruits black, rounded at the top. It is not so handsome as L. lucidum and is of uncertain taxonomic status.

'Aureovariegatum'

Leaves variegated with dull yellow; ineffective.

'Excelsum Superbum'

In the Manual of Messrs Hillier this is described as a very striking variegated form, with the leaves margined and mottled deep yellow and creamy white.

'Tricolor'

Leaves with a broad but irregular border of white, pinkish when young. Very striking when well grown. This variety has reached a height of 35 ft at Winchester in Messrs Hilliers’ West Hill nursery, where it is grown without wall protection.

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