Ligustrum japonicum Thunb.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Ligustrum japonicum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/ligustrum/ligustrum-japonicum/). Accessed 2020-05-30.

Genus

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
bloom
Bluish or greyish waxy substance on leaves or fruits.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
inflorescence
Flower-bearing part of a plant; arrangement of flowers on the floral axis.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Ligustrum japonicum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/ligustrum/ligustrum-japonicum/). Accessed 2020-05-30.

An evergreen shrub, rarely more than 6 to 12 ft high in this country, of bushy habit; twigs covered when young with minute dark down, becoming quite glabrous. Leaves glabrous, almost black-green, very glossy, ovate, 112 in. to 4 in. long, 34 to 2 in. wide, usually rounded, sometimes tapering at the base, taper-pointed at the apex; stalk 14 to 12 in. long. Flowers white, borne in terminal pyramidal panicles 4 to 8 in. high and as much wide; flower-stalks clothed with minute down. In bloom from July to September.

Native of N. China, Korea, Japan; introduced to Europe by Siebold in 1845. It is closely allied to L. lucidum, and much confused with it in gardens, but is a less vigorous shrub, its leaves are darker green, shorter, more rounded at the base, and the nerves beneath are raised, whereas in L. lucidum they are sunken; the corolla-tube is twice as long as the calyx and equal to the corolla-lobes in L. japonicum in contrast to equal to or slightly less than the lobes and the calyx in L. lucidum; furthermore the inflorescence is looser, and the young shoots minutely downy. It is a useful and effective evergreen because of the intensely dark shining foliage, but needs a sheltered spot.


'Rotundifolium' ('Coriaceum')

An exceedingly stiff-habited evergreen shrub 4 to 6 ft or perhaps more high; young shoots short, stunted, covered with very minute dark down the first season. Leaves crowded, 1 to 2{1/2} in. long, from two-thirds to fully as wide, broadly oval or round, very blunt or notched at the apex, dark glossy green, thick and leathery; stalk {1/5} in. long. Flowers white, in erect pyramidal panicles 2 or 3 in. long. Fruits black, globose, about {1/5} in. wide. Bot. Mag., t. 7519. An inhabitant of Japanese gardens, not known in the wild; introduced by Fortune in 1860. A curiosity only, for the flowers have little beauty and it has no elegance of habit or foliage (L. j. var. rotundifolium Bl.; L. coriaceum Carr.; L. j. var. coriaceum (Carr.) Lav.).

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