Leycesteria formosa Wall.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Leycesteria formosa' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/leycesteria/leycesteria-formosa/). Accessed 2020-01-18.

Genus

Other species in genus

Glossary

berry
Fleshy indehiscent fruit with seed(s) immersed in pulp.
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
Tibet
Traditional English name for the formerly independent state known to its people as Bod now the Tibet (Xizang) Autonomous Region of the People’s Republic of China. The name Xizang is used in lists of Chinese provinces.
bloom
Bluish or greyish waxy substance on leaves or fruits.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
entire
With an unbroken margin.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
glandular
Bearing glands.
glaucous
Grey-blue often from superficial layer of wax (bloom).
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Leycesteria formosa' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/leycesteria/leycesteria-formosa/). Accessed 2020-01-18.

A half-woody, deciduous plant, with erect, hollow stems, 4 or 5 ft sometimes much more high, covered with glaucous bloom, glabrous, very leafy. Leaves, opposite, ovate, heart-shaped at the base, with long tapered points, varying in size according to the vigour of the shoot from 2 to 7 in. long, about half as wide„ entire or with small teeth, deep green above, greyish and slightly downy when young beneath; stalk 14 to 1 in. long. Flower-spikes produced from June to September, either at the end of the shoot or in the uppermost leaf-axils, 1 to 4 in. long. Flowers stalkless, arranged in tiers, each tier supported by handsome claret-coloured bracts of the same shape as the leaves and from 12 to 112 in. long, which persist until the fruit is ripe. Corolla 34 in. long and wide, funnel-shaped, five-lobed, purplish, slightly hairy; calyx one-third the length of the corolla, with five erect, awl-shaped, hairy lobes. Berry like a small gooseberry, reddish purple, glandular-downy, about 12 in. long, many-seeded, surmounted by the persistent sepals; ripe in October. Bot. Mag., t. 3699.

Native of the Himalaya in shady forests, and of W. China and E. Tibet; introduced in 1824. This handsome shrub likes a rich soil, and, in spite of its natural habitats, a sunny spot. The bracts and fruits colour better under a full exposure. Birds, especially pheasants, are very fond of the berries, for which reason it is sometimes planted as covert. It should be propagated by seed, which ripens in such abundance and germinates so freely that an enormous stock can soon be raised.


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