Leucothoë racemosa (L.) A. Gray

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Leucothoë racemosa' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/leucothoe/leucothoe-racemosa/). Accessed 2020-08-03.

Genus

Synonyms

  • Andromeda racemosa L.
  • A. spicata Wats.
  • L. spicata (Wats.) D. Don
  • Eubotrys racemosa (L.) Nutt.

Glossary

corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
anther
Pollen-producing structure of flower at the tip of the filament; part of a stamen.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Leucothoë racemosa' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/leucothoe/leucothoe-racemosa/). Accessed 2020-08-03.

A deciduous shrub of bushy, erect habit, generally 4 to 6 ft high in cultivation but occasionally twice as high; young shoots usually finely downy. Leaves narrowly oval or inclined to obovate, 1 to 212 in. long, 12 to 114 in. wide; pointed at both ends, shallowly round-toothed, of firm texture, downy on the midrib beneath; stalk 18 in. or less long. Flowers produced during June in one-sided racemes 1 to 4 in. long, sometimes branched, usually terminating short twigs of the previous year. Corolla white, cylindrical, 13 in. long; sepals triangular-ovate, finely hairy on the margin; flower-stalk very short, glabrous, with two bracteoles close beneath the calyx. Each anther is terminated by four awns, two to each cell.

Native of the eastern United States from Massachusetts southwards; introduced in 1736. This is a perfectly hardy, free-growing shrub which flowers abundantly, and is one of the prettiest of June-flowering shrubs. It requires an occasional thinning out of the older wood. Propagated by cuttings of nearly ripened young shoots. Allied to L. recurva (q.v.).

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