Lespedeza cyrtobotrya Miq.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Lespedeza cyrtobotrya' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/lespedeza/lespedeza-cyrtobotrya/). Accessed 2020-01-25.

Genus

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
trifoliolate
With three leaflets.
umbel
Inflorescence in which pedicels all arise from same point on peduncle. May be flat-topped (as in e.g. Umbelliferae) to spherical (as in e.g. Araliaceae). umbellate In form of umbel.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Lespedeza cyrtobotrya' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/lespedeza/lespedeza-cyrtobotrya/). Accessed 2020-01-25.

A small deciduous shrub, which in this country sends up from the base every summer a number of erect, woody stems 2 to 3 ft high, that do not survive the winter, but die back to ground-level; bark downy. Leaves trifoliolate, 3 to 5 in. long; leaflets 1 to 134 in. long, 12 to 34 in. wide, oval or obovate, covered beneath with a fine down especially early in the season, apex rounded or slightly notched, the midrib ending in a short bristle; base tapered. Flowers crowded in umbel­like racemes 112 in. long, which spring from the axils of the upper leaves of the shoot, rosy-purple, 12 to 58 in. long. Calyx-teeth spine-tipped. Pods ovate, 14 in. long, one-seeded.

Native of Japan and Korea; introduced to Kew in 1899. It is a pretty plant scarcely known in cultivation, and blossoms in August.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

This species, which is rare in cultivation, was reintroduced to Kew from South Korea in 1982 (B.E. & C. 178). The seed was gathered from plants about 5 ft high, growing in full sun in acid sand or gravel.


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