Laurelia serrata Bertero

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Laurelia serrata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/laurelia/laurelia-serrata/). Accessed 2020-01-18.

Genus

Synonyms

  • L. philippiana Looser
  • L. aromatica Mast., not Poir.

Other species in genus

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
receptacle
Enlarged end of a flower stalk that bears floral parts; (in some Podocarpaceae) fleshy structure bearing a seed formed by fusion of lowermost seed scales and peduncle.
appressed
Lying flat against an object.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
perianth
Calyx and corolla. Term used especially when petals and sepals are not easily distinguished from each other.
receptacle
Enlarged end of a flower stalk that bears floral parts; (in some Podocarpaceae) fleshy structure bearing a seed formed by fusion of lowermost seed scales and peduncle.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Laurelia serrata' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/laurelia/laurelia-serrata/). Accessed 2020-01-18.

An evergreen tree with four-angled downy young stems, often of very slender habit in the wild. Leaves leathery, opposite, narrowly elliptical, 212 to 5 in. long, 1 to 212 in. wide, tapered at both ends, saw-toothed, dark glossy green and glabrous above, midrib beneath furnished with yellowish, centrally attached hairs; stalk 14 in. long, downy. When crushed the leaf has a pleasant, spicy fragrance, similar to that of the bay laurel. Flowers borne in the leaf-axils in clusters of three to nine; pedicels about 18 in. long. Calyx-tube (receptacle) cup-shaped, with eight equal lobes (perianth segments). Stamens of male flowers four in number; filaments glabrous, shorter than the anthers. Receptacle globose in the fruiting stage; achenes furnished with a tuft of long, fine, brown hairs, which enable them to travel long distances on the wind. Bot. Mag., t. 8279.

Native of Chile and bordering parts of Argentina. This interesting tree is quite hardy in Sussex if well sheltered from cold winds but grows best near the Atlantic seaboard. A tree at Penjerrick in Cornwall measured 47 × 314 ft in 1911; it is now about as high and 612 ft in girth, but dying at the top (1966). Others in the same county are: Tregothnan, 46 × 412 ft (1971) and Caerhays, 42 × 314 ft (1971). The plate in the Botanical Magazine was drawn from material from the fine specimen at Kilmacurragh in Co. Wicklow, Eire. Planted about 1868 this measures 51 × 714 ft (1966). This tree bears flowers of both sexes and produces fertile seeds.

L. sempervirens (Ruiz & Pavon) Tulasne Pavonia sempervirens Ruiz & Pavon; L. aromatica Poir. – This species has a more northern distribution than L. serrata and yields a superior timber, but is now rather rare, owing to overexploitation and to the felling or burning of the forests of Nothofagus obliqua which were its main habitat. It is closely allied to L. serrata but can be distinguished by the following characters: leaves with rather shallow, appressed teeth and a glabrous midrib; flowers on pedicels 38 to 34 in. long; filaments of stamens downy and as long as the anthers. Also, according to Dr Muñoz Pizarro (Sinopsis de la Flora Chilena, p. 244) the bark of L. sempervirens is aromatic and the wood odourless, whereas in L. serrata the bark is odourless and the wood has an unpleasant smell.

There is a fine specimen of L. sempervirens at Nymans in Sussex, near the glasshouses, raised from seeds collected by H. F. Comber in Chile in 1926 under No. 592.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

specimens: Penjerrick, Cornwall, 60 × 714 ft (1979); Caerhays, Cornwall, 50 × 414 ft (1984); Trebah, Cornwall, 62 × 434 ft (1984); Singleton Abbey, Swansea, 54 × 512 ft, a fine spire-shaped tree (1982).

L. sempervirens - specimens: Nymans, Sussex, 46 × 334 ft (1983); Wakehurst Place, Sussex, 28 × 514 ft (1984).


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