Juniperus conferta Parl.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Juniperus conferta' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/juniperus/juniperus-conferta/). Accessed 2020-10-28.

Genus

Synonyms

  • J. litoralis Maxim.

Glossary

bloom
Bluish or greyish waxy substance on leaves or fruits.
glaucous
Grey-blue often from superficial layer of wax (bloom).
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
keeled
With a prominent ridge.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
ovoid
Egg-shaped solid.
prostrate
Lying flat.
synonym
(syn.) (botanical) An alternative or former name for a taxon usually considered to be invalid (often given in brackets). Synonyms arise when a taxon has been described more than once (the prior name usually being the one accepted as correct) or if an article of the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature has been contravened requiring the publishing of a new name. Developments in taxonomic thought may be reflected in an increasing list of synonyms as generic or specific concepts change over time.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Juniperus conferta' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/juniperus/juniperus-conferta/). Accessed 2020-10-28.

An evergreen prostrate shrub with angular young shoots densely clothed with leaves. Leaves in whorls of three, awl-shaped, 14 to 58 in. long, 116 in. or less wide; very sharply pointed, pale glossy green and keeled beneath, grooved above with one broad glaucous line of stomata along the middle. Fruits globose, 14 to 12 in. wide, black covered with glaucous bloom and containing three ovoid, triangular seeds.

Native of the sea-coasts of Japan, especially on the sand dunes of Hakodate Bay in Hokkaido, where it was found by Maximowicz in 1861. Introduced by Wilson in 1914. It should be a useful plant for growing near the sea and certainly makes an excellent low ground cover. Botanically it is most closely allied to J. rigida, especially in the grooved leaves with one stomatic stripe above and in the three-seeded fruit, but that species is a small tree with much more thinly disposed leaves. In habit J. conferta more resembles J. procumbens, a species well distinguished by the green midrib dividing the stomatic upper surface into two stripes. J. procumbens has been grown erroneously under the name of “J. litoralis”, which is really a synonym of J. conferta. Young plants of J. conferta have their leaves much less densely set on the branchlets than adult ones.

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