Jasminum beesianum Forr. & Diels

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Jasminum beesianum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/jasminum/jasminum-beesianum/). Accessed 2020-01-20.

Genus

Glossary

berry
Fleshy indehiscent fruit with seed(s) immersed in pulp.
corolla
The inner whorl of the perianth. Composed of free or united petals often showy.
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
simple
(of a leaf) Unlobed or undivided.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Jasminum beesianum' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/jasminum/jasminum-beesianum/). Accessed 2020-01-20.

A deciduous species of variable habit, being in nature an erect shrub or a climber, or found trailing on the ground and rooting at the nodes; shoots minutely downy when young especially at the joints, slender, grooved. Leaves simple, opposite, ovate to lanceolate, 114 to 2 in. long, 13 to 34 in. wide, dark green above, greyish green beneath with short down on both sides, at least when young; stalks 18 in. or less long. Flowers usually in threes produced in the terminal leaf-axils of short, leafy twigs. Each flower is 38 to 12 in. wide, rose to carmine (also, according to Wilson, rarely pale rose to white); the corolla is tubular at the base, hairy in the throat, spreading at the mouth into usually six rounded lobes, fragrant. Fruit a rather flattened, globose berry, black, 12 in wide. Bot. Mag., t. 9097.

Native of Szechwan and Yunnan, China; introduced by Forrest in 1906 for the firm of Bees Ltd. I have never seen it noticeably attractive in flower, but it produces large crops of shining black berries which give a fine effect and remain on the branches well into winter. The completely red flowers are unique for the genus. It is quite hardy and one of the parents of J. × stephanense.


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