Itoa Hemsl.

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Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Itoa' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/itoa/). Accessed 2020-08-09.

Family

  • Salicaceae (formerly Flacourtiaceae)

Species in genus

Glossary

axillary
Situated in an axil.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
capsule
Dry dehiscent fruit; formed from syncarpous ovary.
crenate
With rounded teeth at the edge.
androdioecious
With only male or only hermaphrodite flowers on individual plants.
divergent
Spreading from the centre.
petiole
Leaf stalk.
pistillate
Female referring to female plants (dioecy) or flowers (monoecy) or the female parts of a hermaphrodite flower.
simple
(of a leaf) Unlobed or undivided.
staminate
Male referring to male plants (dioecy) or flowers (monoecy) or the male parts of a hermaphrodite flower.
valvate
(of similar parts of a plant: e.g. petals) Meeting without overlapping; (of dehiscent fruit) opening via valves.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from New Trees, Ross Bayton & John Grimshaw

Recommended citation
'Itoa' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/itoa/). Accessed 2020-08-09.

Itoa comprises two species, one in southern China and Indochina (I. orientalis), which is in cultivation, and another in eastern Indonesia (I. stapfii (Koord.) Sleumer). The two species are very similar, and if it were not for their divergent distributions they might easily be lumped together. They are evergreen trees with large, simple, spirally arranged leaves; the leaves have a sturdy petiole, crenate margins and no stipules. Both species are dioecious, the staminate flowers held in erect, terminal panicles, the pistillate flowers solitary and axillary. The flowers have a leathery, valvate calyx, with three (to four) lobes, and no petals; the staminate flowers have numerous stamens, the anthers minute. The fruit is a large, egg-shaped capsule, which eventually divides (partially) into (five to) six to eight segments, releasing numerous winged seeds (Sleumer 1954).

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