Indigofera kirilowii Palib.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Indigofera kirilowii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/indigofera/indigofera-kirilowii/). Accessed 2020-07-07.

Genus

Synonyms

  • I. macrostachya Bge., not Vent.

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
imparipinnate
Odd-pinnate; (of a compound leaf) with a central rachis and an uneven number of leaflets due to the presence of a terminal leaflet. (Cf. paripinnate.)

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Indigofera kirilowii' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/indigofera/indigofera-kirilowii/). Accessed 2020-07-07.

A small shrub or sub-shrub, with erect stems, which are slightly hairy when very young, soon glabrous and somewhat angular. Leaves pinnate, 4 to 6 in. long, composed of usually seven to eleven leaflets which vary in shape from roundish to broadly ovate, obovate, or rhomboidal, 12 to 114 in. long, wedge-shaped or rounded at the base, tapered at the apex, and terminated by a fine bristle-like elongation of the midrib, bright green above, both surfaces furnished with pale flattened hairs. Racemes erect, about 5 in. long, the flowers crowded on the upper half; rose-coloured, 34 in. long; calyx slightly hairy, and with sharp, unequal, lance-shaped lobes. Pods 112 to 2 in. long, 16 in. wide. Bot. Mag., t. 8580.

Native of N. China, Korea and S. Japan; introduced to Britain before 1914, by which time there were plants at Kew received from M. de Vilmorin and from the Arnold Arboretum. Like I. decora it is a dwarf shrub, but it is easily distinguished from that species by the shorter, broader leaves, hairy on both sides. If the stems arc killed to the ground in winter a new crop will be produced the following summer, bearing their flowers in June and July.


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