Indigofera hebepetala Benth.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Indigofera hebepetala' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/indigofera/indigofera-hebepetala/). Accessed 2024-04-22.

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
appressed
Lying flat against an object.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.
imparipinnate
Odd-pinnate; (of a compound leaf) with a central rachis and an uneven number of leaflets due to the presence of a terminal leaflet. (Cf. paripinnate.)
raceme
Unbranched inflorescence with flowers produced laterally usually with a pedicel. racemose In form of raceme.
standard petal
(in the flowers of some legumes) Large upper petal; also known as ‘vexillum’.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Indigofera hebepetala' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/indigofera/indigofera-hebepetala/). Accessed 2024-04-22.

A deciduous shrub, growing about 4 ft high at Kew, but considerably taller where it is not cut back during winter; stems glabrous, except when quite young. Leaves pinnate, 7 to 9 in. long, with usually seven to nine (occasionally eleven) leaflets, which are oblong, broadly oval or slightly ovate, short-stalked, 1 to 212 in. long, half as much wide, rounded or notched at the apex, glabrous above, with appressed hairs beneath. Racemes 3 to 9 in. long, produced from the leaf-axils of the terminal part of the shoot, and developing in succession as it lengthens. Flowers closely set, twenty to sixty on one raceme, each 12 to 58 in. long, the standard petal crimson, wing and keel petals rose-coloured. Pods 112 to 2 in. long, cylindric, glabrous, carrying eight to ten seeds. Bot. Mag., t. 8208.

Native of the north-western Himalaya, where it is widely spread at altitudes of 6,000 to 8,000 ft. It is strange that so handsome a shrub should be so little known in gardens. The date of its introduction is not recorded, but it has been cultivated at Kew since 1881, when it came with a collection of plants bequeathed by J. C. Joad, a well-known amateur of his time. It produces its richly coloured racemes during August and September. In the open ground its stems rarely survive the winter, and are generally cut back to the old woody stool, a new crop springing up in early summer.