Indigofera

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Indigofera' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/indigofera/). Accessed 2020-09-23.

Family

  • Leguminosae

Glossary

axillary
Situated in an axil.
dehiscent
Opening naturally. (Cf. indehiscent.)
family
A group of genera more closely related to each other than to genera in other families. Names of families are identified by the suffix ‘-aceae’ (e.g. Myrtaceae) with a few traditional exceptions (e.g. Leguminosae).
included
(botanical) Contained within another part or organ.
imparipinnate
Odd-pinnate; (of a compound leaf) with a central rachis and an uneven number of leaflets due to the presence of a terminal leaflet. (Cf. paripinnate.)

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Indigofera' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/indigofera/). Accessed 2020-09-23.

A large genus of herbs and shrubs, mostly tropical and subtropical, notable in containing the indigo plant (I. tinctoria). Of the shrubby species a few may be grown outdoors in Britain, but the shoots in our climate, although woody, are usually only of annual duration, unless given the protection of a wall. The leaves, in the species described here, are odd-pinnate. Flowers usually pink or purple, with the typical shape of the pea family, arranged in axillary racemes; the keel has a swelling or spur on either side. Pods dehiscent, not jointed, but with thin partitions between the seeds. A feature of the indigoferas is that the hairs are attached by their centres, like cleats (medifixed).

The species here included are all handsome plants, requiring a light or medium garden soil and a sunny position. All, so far as is known, will grow on chalky soils. They are increased by cuttings made of half-ripened shoots placed in a close, slightly heated frame. The cuttings should be kept under glass the first winter, remaining in their pots until the spring.

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