Ilex rugosa Fr. Schmidt

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Ilex rugosa' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/ilex/ilex-rugosa/). Accessed 2020-01-18.

Genus

Glossary

apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
bloom
Bluish or greyish waxy substance on leaves or fruits.
glaucous
Grey-blue often from superficial layer of wax (bloom).
lax
Loose or open.
ovoid
Egg-shaped solid.
pollination
Act of placing pollen on the stigma. Various agents may initiate pollination including animals and the wind.
prostrate
Lying flat.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Ilex rugosa' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/ilex/ilex-rugosa/). Accessed 2020-01-18.

A low evergreen shrub of spreading, sometimes prostrate habit; young shoots not downy, angled. Leaves narrowly oval or oblong, tapered about equally to each end, blunt or rounded at the apex, shallowly round-toothed, 34 to 2 in. long, 38 to 34 in. wide, dark bright green and wrinkled above, paler and conspicuously veined beneath, not downy; stalk 18 in. long. Flowers shortly stalked; males six or eight, females one or two in the leaf axils. Fruits often solitary, roundish ovoid, about 14 in. wide, red, ripe in September.

Native of Japan and Sakhalin; originally described and named in 1868; introduced to cultivation in 1895, but very rare in this country. It is very distinct among cultivated hollies in its lax growth (making slender shoots up to 1 ft long in a season) and especially in the wrinkled surface of its leaves. It is very hardy in the Arnold Arboretum and ought to be quite hardy with us, but shrubs from its native regions are often excited into growth too early in spring and suffer from late frosts in consequence.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

Hybrids between this species and I. aquifolium, raised by Mrs Meserve of Long Island, New York, have been given botanical status as I. × meserveae S. Y. Hu. They are also known as the ‘blue hollies’, from the glaucous bloom on their leaves. These hollies take from I. rugosa a comparatively low stature. Of the two clones that have been offered in commerce, ‘Blue Angel’ makes a bushy, compact shrub said to attain about 5 ft in time. It is female and interestingly sets fruit without any need for pollination, the ovaries starting to swell rapidly even before the petals have fallen. The other, ‘Blue Prince’, grows taller; it is male.


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