Ilex montana A. Gray

TSO logo

Sponsor this page

For information about how you could sponsor this page, see How You Can Help

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Ilex montana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/ilex/ilex-montana/). Accessed 2020-07-05.

Genus

Synonyms

  • I. monticola A. Gray
  • I. dubia var. monticola (A. Gray) Locs.

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
ciliate
Fringed with long hairs.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
globose
globularSpherical or globe-shaped.
lanceolate
Lance-shaped; broadest in middle tapering to point.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Ilex montana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/ilex/ilex-montana/). Accessed 2020-07-05.

A deciduous shrub (sometimes a tree in the wild), with glabrous young stems. Leaves ovate to oval, with a long, tapering, lanceolate point, and a wedge-shaped base, sharply toothed, 2 to 5 in. long, 34 to 214 in. wide, pale green, glabrous, or downy only on the midrib and veins; stalk slender, 14 to 58 in. long. Flowers white, the males crowded at the end of short spur-like branches, or in the leaf-axils of the previous year’s growth, along with two or three leaves; the females short-stalked, fewer, often soliary. Calyx-lobes ciliate. Fruits globose, bright orange red, 38 in. across, borne on stalks about 14 in. long.

Native of the eastern United States from New York State southwards. It is allied to I. decidua, having the fruits red, the seeds many-ribbed at the back, and leaves often clustered on short spurs, but I. decidua has round-toothed leaves usually widest above the middle, and blunt at the apex. Introduced to Kew from N. Carolina in 1899, but possibly in cultivation earlier.


Feedback

A site produced by the International Dendrology Society.

For copyright and licence information, see the Licence page.

To contact the editors: info@treesandshrubsonline.org.