Ilex kingiana Cockerell

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Ilex kingiana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/ilex/ilex-kingiana/). Accessed 2020-01-18.

Genus

Synonyms

  • I. insignis Hook, f., not Heer
  • I. nobilis Gumbleton, nom. illegit .

Glossary

entire
With an unbroken margin.
lustrous
Smooth and shiny.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
ovate
Egg-shaped; broadest towards the stem.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Ilex kingiana' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/ilex/ilex-kingiana/). Accessed 2020-01-18.

A small evergreen tree without any down; branchlets stout, silvery grey, lustrous. Leaves oblong inclining to elliptic or ovate, 5 to 9 in. long, 2 to 212 in. wide, slender-pointed, tapered at the base, armed at the edges with small spine-tipped teeth, rarely almost entire, thick and rather rigid, dark green above, midrib pale green, prominent; stalk 34 to 1 in. long, purplish. Flowers clustered scarcely stalked. Fruits bright red, roundish oval, 38 in. long, each containing a single stone made up of four fused nutlets.

Native of the E. Himalaya at 6,000 to 8,000 ft. In a small or seedling state it is quite distinct, the leaf-margins being wavy and formidably armed with numerous spiny teeth 14 to 13 in. long, pointing different ways. It is unfortunate that this splendid holly can only be grown in the milder parts of the British Isles. At Kew it has to be given the protection of a cold greenhouse. There are two examples at Caerhays in Cornwall, and it received an Award of Merit when shown from there on 25 February, 1964.

It is unfortunate that the name I. insignis given to this species by the younger Hooker is invalid, having been used earlier by Heer for a fossil species.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

The specimens at Caerhays, Cornwall, measure 58 × 414 ft and 40 × 514 ft (1984).


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