Ilex dipyrena Wall.

TSO logo

Sponsor this page

For information about how you could sponsor this page, see How You Can Help

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Ilex dipyrena' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/ilex/ilex-dipyrena/). Accessed 2020-04-08.

Genus

Common Names

  • Himalayan Holly

Glossary

entire
With an unbroken margin.
hybrid
Plant originating from the cross-fertilisation of genetically distinct individuals (e.g. two species or two subspecies).
monograph
Taxonomic account of a single genus or family.
variety
(var.) Taxonomic rank (varietas) grouping variants of a species with relatively minor differentiation in a few characters but occurring as recognisable populations. Often loosely used for rare minor variants more usefully ranked as forms.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Ilex dipyrena' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/ilex/ilex-dipyrena/). Accessed 2020-04-08.

An evergreen tree ultimately 40 ft or more high, the angular young shoots and winter buds minutely downy. Leaves oblong or narrowly oval, tapered at the base, slenderly pointed and spine-tipped, 2 to 5 in. long, 58 to 112 in. wide, dull, opaque green, leathery; stalk 14 in. or less long. Like the common holly it is very spiny on the margins when young, but as the plant attains maturity the spines become fewer and finer, and ultimately the leaves of the upper branches become entire. Flowers very numerous, in dense round clusters in the leaf-axils. Fruits oval, red, large for a holly, commonly two-seeded.

Native of the Himalaya, Assam, Upper Burma, and Yunnan. Whilst inferior to the common holly as an ornamental evergreen, both in the lack of lustre on the foliage, and as rarely bearing fruit, this species is interesting and worth growing for its distinctness. It is perfectly hardy at Kew, where there is a handsome specimen in the Holly Avenue. The largest recorded in Britain grows at Linton Park, Kent; this measures 48 × 514 ft (1970). There are slightly smaller trees at Leonardslee and Wakehurst Place in Sussex. At Caerhays, Cornwall, there are two trees raised from seeds collected by Forrest in Yunnan (F.25362 and F.25424).

I. dipyrena varies in its leaves, which may sometimes be sparsely toothed or entire. The var. paucispinosa Loes., and var. connexiva W. W. Sm. are founded on such variations, but neither variety is recognised by Dr Hu in her monograph.

I. × beanii Rehd. I. elliptica (Dallim.) Bean, not H. B. K.; I. dipyrena var. elliptica Dallim. – A hybrid between I. dipyrena and the common holly. It resembles the former in general appearance, the leaves being dull green, although shorter and comparatively broader.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

specimens: Kew, Holly Walk, 44 × 334 + 314 ft (1981); Linton Park, Kent, 54 × 534 ft (1984); Leonardslee, Sussex, 49 × 434 ft (1979); Westonbirt, Glos., 44 × 334 + 312 ft (1980) and, pl. 1939, 33 × 312 ft (1983).

I. dipyrena is also in cultivation from Schilling 2139, collected in Nepal in 1976.


Feedback

A site produced by the International Dendrology Society.

For copyright and licence information, see the Licence page.

To contact the editors: info@treesandshrubsonline.org.