Grevillea rosmarinifolia A. Cunn.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Grevillea rosmarinifolia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/grevillea/grevillea-rosmarinifolia/). Accessed 2020-01-23.

Genus

Glossary

perianth
Calyx and corolla. Term used especially when petals and sepals are not easily distinguished from each other.
alternate
Attached singly along the axis not in pairs or whorls.
anther
Pollen-producing structure of flower at the tip of the filament; part of a stamen.
apex
(pl. apices) Tip. apical At the apex.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
hybrid
Plant originating from the cross-fertilisation of genetically distinct individuals (e.g. two species or two subspecies).

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Grevillea rosmarinifolia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/grevillea/grevillea-rosmarinifolia/). Accessed 2020-01-23.

An evergreen shrub of loose, graceful habit 6 or 7 ft high, with slender, downy branches. Leaves alternate, closely set on the branches, very like those of rosemary, 1 to 2 in. long, averaging 18 in. wide, stalkless, pointed, dark grey-green and rough above, covered beneath with closely pressed silvery hairs. Flowers deep rosy-red, densely arranged in terminal racemes, each flower 1 in. or less long, on a glabrous stalk 14 in. long. Perianth silky inside, glabrous outside, scarcely 12 in. long, with hooked divisions, two long and two short, in the apex of each of which is enclosed an anther; styles about 34 in. long, red. Bot. Mag., t. 5971.

Native of New South Wales; discovered by Allan Cunningham in 1822. Near London this shrub will only survive mild winters but has succeeded and flowered well at Grayswood Hill, Haslemere. In Cornwall it is quite at home, and makes fine bushes 6 or 7 ft high, and twice or thrice as much wide.

From the Supplement (Vol. V)

It has been pointed out by the Australian botanist John Wrigley that the plant sold in Britain under this name is a hybrid between G. rosmarinifolia and G. lanigera (a species not treated in this work).


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