Grevillea alpina Lindl.

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Grevillea alpina' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/grevillea/grevillea-alpina/). Accessed 2020-11-28.

Genus

Synonyms

  • G. alpeslris Meissn.

Glossary

calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
perianth
Calyx and corolla. Term used especially when petals and sepals are not easily distinguished from each other.
stigma
(in a flower) The part of the carpel that receives pollen and on which it germinates. May be at the tip of a short or long style or may be reduced to a stigmatic surface at the apex of the ovary.
style
Generally an elongated structure arising from the ovary bearing the stigma at its tip.

References

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Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Grevillea alpina' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/grevillea/grevillea-alpina/). Accessed 2020-11-28.

An evergreen shrub usually dwarf and under 2 ft high in gardens, of bushy rounded shape; young shoots clothed with spreading hairs. Leaves set on the twigs several to the inch, narrowly oblong or oval, blunt-ended, 13 to 1 in. long, 112 to 14 in. wide, but made narrower by their recurved margins; dark green, downy, minutely warted above; silky-hairy beneath, stalkless. Flowers produced about five together in terminal clusters, the perianth (calyx) about 12 in. long, curved, swollen at the base, red at the lower part, yellow upwards, downy. A conspicuous part of the flower is the stout downy style with its knob-like stigma standing out 14 in. beyond the calyx and of a similar colour. Bot. Mag., t. 5007.

Native of South Australia in mountainous districts; first flowered in this country apparently by Messrs Rollisson of Tooting in May 1857. It is very frequently shown in spring at the Royal Horticultural Society’s meetings grown in pots. Although in a climate like that of Kew its tenure as an outdoor shrub is insecure and often short, it is about as hardy as G. sulphurea, and (say) thirty miles south of London, is well worth growing in a sunny sheltered spot in the rock garden. It blooms freely and over a long season, but the red of the flowers is not particularly bright.