Grevillea acanthifolia A. Cunn.

TSO logo

Sponsor this page

For information about how you could sponsor this page, see How You Can Help

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Grevillea acanthifolia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/grevillea/grevillea-acanthifolia/). Accessed 2020-08-05.

Genus

Glossary

inflorescence
Flower-bearing part of a plant; arrangement of flowers on the floral axis.
axillary
Situated in an axil.
calyx
(pl. calyces) Outer whorl of the perianth. Composed of several sepals.
glabrous
Lacking hairs smooth. glabrescent Becoming hairless.
inflorescence
Flower-bearing part of a plant; arrangement of flowers on the floral axis.
lobe
Division of a leaf or other object. lobed Bearing lobes.
midrib
midveinCentral and principal vein in a leaf.
ovary
Lowest part of the carpel containing the ovules; later developing into the fruit.
style
Generally an elongated structure arising from the ovary bearing the stigma at its tip.

References

There are currently no active references in this article.

Credits

Article from Bean's Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles

Recommended citation
'Grevillea acanthifolia' from the website Trees and Shrubs Online (treesandshrubsonline.org/articles/grevillea/grevillea-acanthifolia/). Accessed 2020-08-05.

An evergreen plant 4 to 6 ft high; young shoots slightly angular and glabrous except for a few whitish hairs at first. Leaves 2 to 3 in. long, 1 to 114 in. wide, bipinnately lobed, the five or six primary lobes 12 to 34 in. long, reaching nearly to the midrib, again cut into three triangular lobes, each lobe ending in a stiff spine, dark dull green and glabrous except for a few pale hairs when young similar to those on the shoot; stalk 14 to 12 in. long. Inflorescence terminal or axillary, 112 to 3 in. long, with the closely packed flowers all on one side. Flowers dull pink, each about 12 in. long except for the long, strongly curved, glabrous style so characteristic of the grevilleas, which stands out 58 in. beyond the rest of the flower; they have no petals and the calyx is four-lobed, rather bellied below, the lobed part strongly curved. A feature of the inflorescence is the dense furnishing of silky white hairs that cover the flower-stalk, ovary, and calyx. Bot. Mag., t. 2807.

Native of the Blue Mountains, New South Wales, where it was found by Allan Cunningham in 1817; it was introduced soon after. It is evidently hardier than is generally supposed for it was grown out-of-doors at Nymans, near Handcross in Sussex, for a good many years until it perished in the winter of 1928-9. It flowers in May, and whilst the blossom is more curious than attractive, the much-divided, stiff, prickly foliage makes it a distinct and handsome evergreen.

Feedback

A site produced by the International Dendrology Society.

For copyright and licence information, see the Licence page.

To contact the editors: info@treesandshrubsonline.org.